WOODCLIFF LAKE POLICE

COMMUNITY POLICING SECTOR ASSIGNMENTS

                                                              

COMMUNITY POLICING SECTOR ASSIGNMENTS

RESIDENTIAL

 

OFFICERS SECTOR NUMBER
P.O. MATOVSKI        ddeangelis@wclpd.com #1   WOODMONT-CHESTNUT RIDGE-HEATHERHILL
P.O. FOLEY               jfoley@wclpd.com #2   BLUEBERRY DRIVE-HEATHERHILL
P.O. SHERFER           ssherfer@wclpd.com #3   CLAIRMONT DR/WERIMUS RD(NORTH)SADDLE RIVER RD  
P.O. KALMBACH        kkalmbach@wclpd.com #4   WOODCLIFF AVE SOUTH TO WERIMUS LN, BROOKVIEW-PINCREST DRIVE AREAS
P.O. HANSEN          rhansen@wclpd.com #5  WOODCLIFF AVE NORTH TO GLEN ROAD, WOODLAND RD
P.O. POWERS          kpowers@wclpd.com #6  ROSE AVENUE/ WINDING WAY AREAS
P.O. SCHANEL               mschanel@wclpd.com #7  PASCACK ROAD/GLEN ROAD-KENWOOD DRIVE AREA
P.O. INGOGLIA        eingoglia@wclpd.com #8  EAST SIDE-PROSPECT AVENUE/BROADWAY SOUTH
P.O. BROWN           brown@wclpd.com #9  PROSPECT AVE/BROADWAY NORTH

COMMERCIAL

SERGEANTS (201)-391-4977 SECTOR
SGT. SEAN HAMMEL

Ext.510   shammel@wclpd.com

375,379.383,387,391,395,399,403,407,415,419,423,427,431,433,435,437,439,441,

445,449,453 CHESTNUT RIDGE ROAD., 50, 123, 200 TICE BLVD.

SGT. DENNIS DEANGELIS

Ext.512   juhl@wclpd.com

129,136,143,160,172,188,216,281 BROADWAY.  42 KINDERKAMACK,

25 PROSPECT.

SGT. CRAIG DEGEORGE 

Ext. 516  cdegeorge@wclpd.com

100, 155, 300, TICE BLVD.,  477, 485, 585 CHESTNUT RIDGE .

SGT. BRIDGET JENNINGS

Ext.240   bgreve@wclpd.com

150,200,250,300,400,450,470,520,530,595 CHESTNUT RIDGE ROAD. 295 GLEN ROAD,  87, 100 OVERLOOK,  32,171,PASCACK ROAD,  45,209,223 WOODCLIFF AVENUE., 430,555 CHESTNUT RIDGE ROAD, 165 WERIMUS ROAD.
SGT. STEVEN REGULA

Ext.511   sregula@wclpd.com

3,21,80,82,84,86,88,90,92,94,98,104, 115,116,123,126 BROADWAY
DET.SGT. CHAD MALLOY

Ext.524  cmalloy@wclpd.com

210 BROADWAY, 430,555 CHESTNUT RIDGE ROAD 364 GLEN ROAD 290 WERIMUS ROAD
   

Community Policing

 

A new approach for focusing our patrol officers’ time and efforts has been established as of February 2001.  Our patrol officers have each been assigned specific geographical areas of responsibility or “Community Policing Sectors”.  Each officer has been assigned a section of the town, consisting of approximately 220 households.  Officers assigned to these specific areas will be responsible for visiting new residents in order to obtain needed emergency information from them, as well as for providing information and answer any questions the new homeowners may have.  These officers will also be responsible for serving warrants, follow-up on dog licenses, as well as becoming more familiar with their residents.  The officer will be considered as a contact point or “liaison” for the resident and neighborhood.  Sector officers will be utilized in identifying problems, as well as acting as an arbitrator in neighbor disputes.  In addition to the above program for our patrolmen and residents, our Sergeants have also been assigned community policing business sectors.  Similar to the patrol officers visiting each resident, our sergeants will visit the business owners.  They will also act as a liaison to the business owner, in updating emergency information.  Each sergeant will be assigned approximately 30 businesses.Our Captain and Lieutenant have been assigned to implement and monitor monthly progress for each of the officers assigned.  The Captain and Lieutenant  then report to the Chief of Police in their monthly reports.We have established a “voice mailbox” for each of our officers.  Residents can leave messages for non-emergency problems with their sector officer.  These officers will also be responsible for reporting any conditions needing attention in their sectors.  This service to the community is in addition to their regular patrol responsibilities of the entire town.  If the officer is off duty, any of our officers on duty will still respond to the resident’s needs, especially in an emergency.  A specific listing and breakdown of the officers’ sector assignments, as well as telephone mailbox extensions is posted on the Woodcliff Lake Police Web site at www.wclpd.com. 

ORGANIZATION INFORMATION

The Woodcliff Lake Police Department consists of 18 sworn officers and one civilian.  The department was established in 1954, and continues to serve its residents today.  The community has evolved from a rural farming community, dating back to it roots in the 1700s.  Today the farms have been replaced by international corporations, as well as a Hilton Hotel, several nursing home facilities, senior center, twenty two small malls, as well as an entrance an exit to the Garden State Parkway.  The town has grown in the past 60 years from approximately 1 police officer covering 200 home, farms and businesses, to 18 officers with over 2000 homes, and businesses.  We are attempting to bring the best of the old personal touch, into the new century with technology that assists us in streamlining our officers’ time to perform these special community policing functions. At the present time our agency consists of a Police Chief, two Lieutenants, five Sergeants assigned to patrol, one Detective Sergeant, nine Patrol Officers, and one civilian employee.  We are responsible for many programs and cover several bureaus.  Our agency man a detective, traffic and juvenile bureaus.  We have an extensive DARE/L.E.A.Ds. program, covering 5th, and 8th grades.  We have established a bicycle and motorcycle units for special details and events.  Most recently we have begun to re-focus our efforts in the area of Community Policing.  Our patrol officers are assigned residential sectors that they have been given responsibility and “ownership” of.  Our sergeants have been similarly assigned to business sectors.  Our lieutenants are responsible for coordinating and maintaining records for the community policing efforts.  They report to me, as I do the Mayor and Council.  You may wish to view these at our web site www.wclpd.com .    I have received very positive feed back from the Mayor and Council from our residents regarding our programs, especially the community policing efforts.  

PROJECT SELECTION: 

Police Services in Woodcliff Lake evolved from a town “Marshal” prior to 1954 when our agency was established.  In 1954 the Woodcliff Lake Police Department was incorporated.  Three officers, including the Chief of Police patrolled the town, consisting of approximately 200 households as well as several farms and businesses.  The police officer of that era knew the residents personally.  As time progressed, the town expanded, as well as the police department.  Patrol officers were assigned tasks that included visiting new residents, reporting street lights out, serving warrants from other jurisdictions, and following up on dog licenses that were not renewed.  As both the town and the police department grew, it became impossible for any one officer to become familiar with each of the households and businesses that we enjoyed in the past.  Serving warrants, visiting new residents, reporting roadway defects, broken streetlights, missing street and traffic signs, etc. became everyone’s responsibility.  It had become apparent that when something is “everyone’s” responsibility, it is really “no-one’s” responsibility. Officers reporting for duty on any given shift would be handed these tasks to perform and would then be driving all over town to complete these tasks.  It had also become apparent that I could have three officers at three houses on the same street performing different and unrelated tasks. We had to come up with a more manageable, accountable, and efficient way of utilizing our manpower.  After speaking with our retired Chief of Police, I gained an insight as to how the pure essence of “Community Policing” was performed in the past.  We had to come up with a process that would attempt to regain the benefits of the past in today’s modern world.  At this time our 18 officers were attempting to service almost 2000 homes and business in a haphazard way.  It was decided that we should revisit the ratio of the one police officer for the then 200+ households of 40 years ago, and re-focus our efforts utilizing the best of the past with the best of today. In February of 2001, I, then a Lieutenant/Acting Chief of Police, instituted the first step in the Sector Assignments portion of this project.  The town was divided into 9 sectors of approximately 200 to 220 households.  Patrol officers were allowed to choose their sector by seniority.  Initially, officers were detailed to tasks in their sector that they were already performing all over town.  I felt that this was an easy way to “ease into” the process by not asking officers to do any additional work than they were already doing. Officers were now responsible for these specific items within their sector or “beat”.  Officers were advised that they were to become familiar with their respective sectors, however they were to patrol the entire town, not just their ten square blocks of their sectors.  Our regular tour strength usually consisted of two patrolmen, east and west sides of town, with a sergeant who would supervise the shift, and act as the “back up” to the patrol officer on any calls on either the east or west side of town. During this initial start-up period, my lieutenants were actively preparing documentation processes and material for our officers to be issued for the next phase of the Community Policing Sector program.

ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES: 

In October of 2001,  the next phase of the Community Policing Sector project.   An actual notebook binder was created including a list of each household the officer was to visit in his sector.  A checklist type of document was utilized to list households visited, and those still pending.  The lieutenant could, at a glance keep tract of each officer’s progress with “spot inspections” of the officer’s notebook.   A notice of this program was announced to the residents in the town newsletter, copy attached, advising the residents that offices will be visiting their homes.  Officers were given “business” cards with their names on it, as well as a letter from me, the Police Chief, explaining the program, see example attached.Each officer was then responsible for setting up his/her notebook.  This consisted of an individual record sheet for each household.  This sheet would include our present resident information card, as well as an alarm card if they had an alarm system.  When the officer made contact with the homeowner while assigned canvassing duties, the officer would introduce himself and present the homeowner with his card and the police chief’s letter.  Once the program was explained, the officer would, with the assistance of the homeowner, update the various information cards.  Once completed, the officer would then indicate this on the “Daily Report”, attached, and in his/her notebook that the household was visited.  The officer would then be required to complete a “monthly report” attached, indicating the number of home attempted, as well as completed.  This report would be submitted to the lieutenant and complied.  This information would be taken by the lieutenant, and transcribed to the monthly Community Policing Canvass report, listing the totals of both attempts and completions.   Over the past several years two significant statistics have developed.  Our rate of calls for suspicious vehicles, called in by our residents has increased.  This in conjunction with the fact that where were no burglaries reported in that following year. We have also enhanced the program and have added the following tasks that are performed by our sector officers. 

 SOLUTIONS: 

The Community Policing Sector program has been established to focus our officers’ efforts in an efficient manor.  Each officer has been given responsibility, accountability and ownership of his/her sector. They are tasked to first canvass their sector in order to introduce themselves to their assigned residents.  They also complete tasks in their sectors that were once completed in a haphazard manner.  They have also been given opportunities to work as a problem solver for any neighbor disputes, or for any specific problems such as parking, speeders, or traffic problems.  Officers have the ability to request for their sectors traffic surveys, deployment of a speed sign warning speeders of their speed, and traffic enforcement.  Officers are allowed to attend specific neighborhood meeting in already established organizations.  Over the past year and a half, our officers have already intervened in neighbor disputes over vegetation at the homeowner’s property line, as well as attempting to communicate Borough Ordinance interpretation for parking complaints. Our officers have also acted in a pro-active manor by having completed surveys within their sectors and then advising home-owners’ that their homes are not well lit and may attract burglars.Our officers have also complied lists of vegetation view obstruction at various intersections within their sector.  This information has been forwarded to our traffic bureau for further inspection and possible action.

 Ours Sergeants have been tasked with a similar sector program regarding our business establishments in town.  Each sergeant is assigned approximately 30 businesses to act as a point of contact for the business owner.  The sergeant is also tasked to visit each business, and update alarm and emergency night contact phone numbers.  They have been instrumental in organizing meetings with business owners and our officers and detectives to discuss problem solving regarding thefts, shoplifting, breakings, and security measures.  These contacts are on going, and are reported monthly as our patrol officers report their contacts.  A lieutenant is tasked to assemble and report the sergeants’ business sector contacts on a monthly basis.  They too are issued a notebook containing the businesses and information sheets, which are required to be updated.   The Community Policing Sector program has been received well by the Mayor and Council.  We have received favorable reviews through our governing body regarding the implementation of this program.  So far, we have not had any “down sides” since we implemented the program.As stated above, each officer has the ability to get “creative”, within the sector.  They have the ability to make suggestions as well as in consulting with our lieutenants regarding implementing programs.  They also coordinate with our traffic, detective and juvenile bureaus.  This constantly evolving program has no limits other than our officer’s imaginations. 

RESULTS: 

The results since the implementation of the Community Policing Sector program has been very favorable.  I continue to receive contacts by many residents applauding this “new” approach.  This new approach, I explain to the callers, is actually a very old concept.  Many of our older residents grew up in an urban environment.  They remember the “cop on the beat” who knew everyone on his beat.  We also have old time life long residents who remember the one or two officers that composed of the police department.  These officers also knew everyone in the town.  Our residents have commented that there is now a name and a face to their police department.  Our web site also gives the resident the opportunity to not only look up their community policing officer, it also illustrates the various programs established by our agency.  The web site also has e-mail capabilities.  See www.wclpd.com 

 RESULTS:  

Each patrol officer retains their sector until they are promoted to the rank of sergeant.  The average time on the job for promotion in our agency ranges from 12 to 15 years on the average.  A new officer coming out of the academy this year will be assigned this sector for that length of time.  This results in a level of consistency that we could not have achieved otherwise.  Our officers assigned to their sectors will by the nature of the program be more readily capable of observing something “out of place” in their sector sooner than another officer patrolling that side of town.  Each officer has been given a “voice mail box”.  The officers have utilized this tool to assist them in communicating with their sector residents when on rotating shifts. I would like to illustrate specific examples of how both the Community/Business Sector program has had a positive effect in reducing crime, and in solving problems within our town.

n    Sector Officer was requested by barricaded subject to respond- On of our residents barricaded himself in his home, threatening to shoot officers and himself.  The County SWAT team was requested and responded.  The only one the subject would speak with was his community policing sector officer.  The officer was off duty, contacted and responded. The officer, along with coaching from the swat team negotiators, talked the subject out of his  house where he was apprehended without shots fired or anyone injured.

n    2004, 2005- No Burglaries reported within the Borough.

n    Apprehension of Armed Robbery Suspects.- A Citgo Gas station was held up at gun point.  A description of the suspects was provided by the attendant.  Our officer spoke with concerned residents in the sector where the robbery was committed.  The robbery suspects were committing a string of gas station robberies in the area, but never returned to a station that was already robbed.  Our residents were advised of this by the sector officer, and advised to call us immediately if these individuals changed their pattern and robbed our station again.  One week after our station was robbed, it was robbed again.  A resident in the sector observed an individual and a vehicle involved in the robbery.  The resident reached out to their officer, giving a valuable description of the suspect and vehicle.  As a direct result of this information, the investigation revealed the identity of the suspects and resulted in their arrest.

n    Apprehension of Burglary Suspects/Apprehension of Professional Burglary Ring Suspects- Our Sergeants involved with our business establishments informed our business owners of individuals and patterns targeting both hotels and high end clothing establishments.  On two separate occasions, as a direct result of the business owners acting on this information, called our agency in a timely manner resulting in the apprehension of the suspects.  The first incident resulted in the Hilton Inn Hotel notifying us of individuals fitting the description of a burglary ring that enters hotels and breaks      into storage rooms containing valuable lap top computers.  Our officers arrived and apprehend the suspects, as well as seizing their vehicle for forfeiture. 

 RESULTS: 

            The second incident resulted from a shoplifting ring that had entered several stores in the Tice’s Corner Mall.  Three stores were hit.  The business owners called each other asking if individuals fitting the “MO” that we described in our meeting with them, were going store to store.  When one of the stores discovered that a large quantity of clothing was taken, they notified our agency.  A second storeowner also advised us that the suspects were in their store giving a detailed description of the actors and their vehicle.  The actors fled, followed by our officers.  They abandoned their vehicle, with almost $10,000. in stolen clothing from three of the stores in the mall.  Officers apprehended one suspect, as well as seizing the vehicle, and recovering the stolen clothing.

n    Centennial Way Parking Problem- An overflow parking problem was brought to our attention from the residents on Centennial Way via the sector officer.  The sector officer along with the traffic bureau, planning board, affordable housing board and my office attempted to find a solution to this present and future problem.  I detailed the sector officer to speak with the homeowners, as well as distribute a letter from the traffic bureau.  After a meeting with the residents, which included the sector officer and Borough Officials, the officer then distributed a letter to the residents from the Chief of Police. Attached.

n    Letter from Resident to Assist with a School Bus Blowing it Horn at 6:45am- The sector officer was contacted by residents who were awakened each morning by a school bus driver blowing his horn at 6:45 am each day.  The officer contacted the bus company, and then parked in the area of the pick up point.  The drive observed that the sector officer and obeyed the law. Police Commissioners Letter to IACP   The Police Commissioners letter to the IACP regarding the positive feedback from our residents regarding the program. These are a few examples of how the Community Policing Sector program has had an impact on our community.

INSTITUTIONALIZATION: 

The Community Policing Sector program has become a permanent standard operating procedure which has replaced our old haphazard methods of completing repetitive tasks.  The first portion of this program is approximately 97% completed with the canvassing program.  Once each officer has made a visit to their assigned household/business, they will continue to maintain and update their file as new residents and businesses move into town.  An example of the ongoing canvassing statistics report is attached. Once completed a second reporting phase will then begin.  We are already in the process of establishing a reporting sheet for each officer to complete monthly regarding officers receiving voice mail requests, the officers’ call backs to the resident/business, a brief description of the problem, as well as the solution or outcome.   The most amazing part of this entire program is that it is not very costly.  The only expenses that we incurred regarded spending money on copying costs as well as for the officer’s notebook binders.  The main ingredient to this program is effort.  The effort on the part of the patrol officers, sergeants, as well as for the command level officers monitoring the program is the key to the success of this program, both present and future.  I feel that I have been able to present this program in the manner that I had envisioned it.  I also feel that this is an ideal program for a “small” police agency.  We do not have a “community policing” bureau, because each of our officers are involved in community policing as part of our every day duties.  This I feel is the essence of the community policing concept. I have included examples in the Supplemental Information Section that any other agency could use to set up a similar program.  Obviously, each agency has to tailor their program to the needs of their community, as well as the talents and capabilities of their officers.  I am fortunate to have a highly talented and self motivated police force.  This makes implementing this program, as well as other programs more than just words on a proposal. In 2002 we established a Police Sub-Station at the Seniors’ Center in t he Tice Corner’s Mall.  We place a call box outside the substation, as well as parked our Traffic Patrol Car at that location.  The Storeowners were very happy to see the increased police presence.  As a result of our program, we made 203 child seat inspections, 201  school walk-through, and 422 community policing contacts.  Now that our initial canvassing is completed, we are having our officers submit a monthly tally sheet indicating school walk –through, contacts, as well as the follow-up for any sector problems encountered and solutions rendered.

 I was proud to have the IACP Police Chief Magazine feature our program in their January 2003 addition.  As a result of this article, I have received many requests for information for our sector program.  These Police Chiefs have expressed an interest in adopting our program for their agency. 

If you have any questions, you can contact me at admin@wclpd.com or at 201-391-4977 x244

 Chief Anthony Jannicelli

Woodcliff Lake Police Department


 

 

 

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SECTOR #1  P.O. Michael Matovski (201)-391-4977  Ext. 238

CHESTNUT RIDGE ROAD.(ALL #175-#315)
OVERLOOK DRIVE (#115 -151) Corner of Saddle River Road to corner of Mill Road Ext.
APPLE RIDGE ROAD ( #115 -#170) Deerfield Drive to Mill Road Ext.
HEATHER HILL ROAD
WILDWOOD ROAD
DEERFIELD DRIVE
SADDLE RIVER ROAD ( Excluding #12 , #14)
STACY LANE
COUNTY ROAD
PICKWICK LANE
STONEWALL COURT
CENTENNIAL WAY
TICE BLVD.
WOODMONT DRIVE
TARYN COURT

HOLLY COURT
SALEM COURT
DIANE COURT
WOODCREST DRIVE
ANDREA COURT
ELAINE COURT

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SECTOR #2 P.O. James Foley  (201)-391-4977  Ext. 513

APPLE RIDGE ROAD (#35-#110 corner of Mill Road Ext)
MILL ROAD EXT
OLD FARMS ROAD
GREENWAY COURT
SHIELD DRIVE
SYCAMORE DRIVE
MARIA ROAD
GINNY DRIVE
BLUEBERRY DRIVE
DEBORAH COURT
HUNTER RIDGE
SPRINGHOUSE ROAD
ANGELA COURT
INDIAN DRIVE
KNOLLWOOD DRIVE
OVERLOOK DRIVE ( #7-#107 Corner of Mill Road Ext)

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SECTOR#3  P.O. Simon Sherfer (201)-391-4977  Ext. 526

AVON PLACE
BEDFORD ROAD
BENJAMIN COURT
BRIARWOOD COURT
CLAREMONT DRIVE
EVAN COURT
FIELDSTONE COURT
GLEN ROAD(#248-#360)Corner of Chestnut Ridge Road to Spring Valley Road
HARVARD COURT
HEIDI LANE
LEONE COURT
LYNN COURT
POND ROAD
PRINCETON DRIVE
RUTGERS COURT
SADDLE RIVER ROAD( #12 AND #14)
SOMERSET DRIVE
STRATFORD COURT
SYLVIA COURT
TAMARACK DRIVE
THOMAS COURT
WERIMUS ROAD (#324-#173) Corner of Glen Road to the corner of Saddle River Road
WINDHAM COURT
WYANDEMERE DRIVE

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SECTOR #4   P.O. Keith Kalmbach (201)-391-4977  Ext. 527

ALLEN DRIVE
BALSAM ROAD
BLISS COURT
BROOKVIEW DRIVE
COLONIAL COURT
DANIEL COURT
DAVID LANE
FERN STREET
HATHEWAY COURT
LONDON COURT
MARZ DRIVE
(MULHOLLAND DEVELOPMENT)
OAK AVENUE
OLDE ENGLISH COURT
OLD MILL ROAD
PINECREST DRIVE
REEDS LANE
WERIMUS ROAD (#172-#3)
WERIMUS LANE
WRIGHT STREET NORTH
WRIGHT STREET SOUTH
VAN RIPER LANE.

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SECTOR #5   P.O. Ryan Hansen (201)-391-4977  Ext. 531

GLEN ROAD (#232 corner of Spring Valley Road to #128 corner of Ravine Drive)
BIRCHWOOD DRIVE
STEPHEN COURT
BEARBROOK DRIVE
WOODLAND DRIVE
RODGER COURT
MEADOW LANE
FOX HOLLOW LANE
DOUGLAS TERRACE
OAKWOOD DRIVE( #22-#45)
OLDE WOODS LANE
HILLCREST ROAD
MAPLE HILL ROAD
WOODLAND DRIVE
DORCHESTER ROAD
BERKSHIRE ROAD
CAMBRIDGE ROAD
MARJO COURT
WINTHROP DRIVE
CARRINGTON COURT
ARCADIA ROAD
SHAW ROAD
LEONARD COURT
WOODCLIFF AVENUE( #223-#135) Corner of Werimus Road to corner of Daniel Court)

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SECTOR #6   P.O. Kathy Powers (201)-391-4977  Ext. 517

CARNOT AVENUE(NORTH)
CARNOT AVENUE(SOUTH)
DENNIS COURT
EAGLE HILL ROAD
EDGE HILL COURT
FAIRVIEW AVENUE
GLEN ROAD ( from the corner of Ravine Drive to #128 to #4)
HENKE COURT
NOWAK COURT
OAKWOOD DRIVE(#7-#22) Corner of Ravine Drive to Rose Avenue)
RAVINE DRIVE
ROSE AVENUE
SOPHIE COURT
STONE RIDGE
WINDING WAY

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SECTOR #7   PO. Matthew Schanel   (201)-391-4977  Ext. 520

ACKERMAN AVENUE
ANDERSON COURT
BURLINGTON COURT
BREE COURT
CARRIAGE ROAD
CHURCH ROAD
CLAIRE CIRCLE
DOGWOOD LANE
ELLIS LANE
EMERY LANE
FRANKLIN STREET
GARY COURT
HERITAGE COURT
KENWOOD DRIVE
LAKEVIEW DRIVE
LONGWOOD DRIVE
LORI COURT
LYONS COURT
MARIA DRIVE
MILL ROAD
OLD PASCACK ROAD
ORCHARD STREET
PASCACK ROAD
STURBRIDGE DRIVE
TAFT COURT
WELTER AVENUE
WESTHILL ROAD
WILLOW STREET WOODCLIFF AVENUE (from the corner of Daniel Court to #139-#4)

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SECTOR #8  P.O. Eric Ingoglia (201)-391-4977  Ext. 522

BROADWAY (#33 -#150)
COLUMBUS AVENUE
MAGNOLIA AVENUE
LINCOLN
ZANONI STREET
OAK STREET
EVERGREEN STREET
MARTHA STREET
CAMPBELL AVENUE
KINDERKAMACK ROAD (#2-#42)
KINGS COURT
NATMARK COURT
RUCKMAN ROAD (South of Prospect Avenue, #7-#43)
PROSPECT AVENUE

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SECTOR #9   P.O. Paul Brown (201)-391-4977  Ext. 525

BROADWAY (#160-#270)
PROSPECT AVENUE (North side of roadway odd numbers, #9- #159)
CYPRESS STREET
CRICKET LANE
ELM STREET
KINDERKAMACK ROAD (#50-#111)
SIBBALD DRIVE
CLINTON PLACE
ANTON COURT
JAMES STREET
EDWARD PLACE
HIGHVIEW AVENUE
AMY COURT
RENEE COURT
MICHAEL STREET
CRESSFIELD COURT
LINDA TERRACE
RUCKMAN ROAD(North of Prospect Avenue)

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